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Male Pattern Baldness

Male Pattern Baldness

[bt_quote style="box" width="0"] Male pattern hair loss is an inherited condition, caused by a genetically determined sensitivity to the effects of dihydrotestosterone, or DHT in some areas of the scalp. [/bt_quote] [bt_accordion width="0" active_first="yes" icon="plus-square-1"] [bt_spoiler title="Definition" icon="list"] Hair loss resulting in thinning is known as alopecia. When it is related to hormones (androgens) and genetics, it is known as androgenetic alopecia. When androgenetic alopecia denudes an area of the scalp it is called baldness. Male pattern hair loss is characterised by a receding hairline and/or hair loss on the top and front of the head. [/bt_spoiler] [bt_spoiler title="Causes" icon="list"] Male pattern baldness is related to your genes and male sex hormones. It usually follows a pattern of receding hairline and hair thinning on the crown, and is caused by hormones and genetic predisposition.
Each strand of hair you have sits in a tiny hole (cavity) in the skin called a follicle. Generally, baldness occurs when the hair follicle shrinks over time, resulting in shorter and finer hair. Eventually, the follicle does not grow new hair. The follicles remain alive, which suggests that it is still possible to grow new hair. [/bt_spoiler] [bt_spoiler title=" What is the normal hair growth cycle?" icon="list"] All hair follicles are replaced at different rates by the normal process of hair cycling. Hair growth alternates between phases of activity and rest. The growth period, called the anagen phase, lasts for two to six years. During this time, the follicle is long and deep, and produces thick, well-pigmented hair. About 90% of all scalp hairs are in the anagen phase at a given time.
Anagen is followed by a brief transition phase known as the catagen phase, which lasts 1–2 weeks. During this time, the base of the follicle shrivels. The resting period, or telogen phase, follows catagen and lasts for 3 months. In this phase, the shrunken follicle retains the hair fibre. Following the telogen phase, the next anagen phase begins, and the old hair is dislodged and falls out to make room for a new hair to begin growing in its place. [/bt_spoiler] [bt_spoiler title="Symptoms" icon="list"] The typical pattern of male baldness begins at the hairline. The hairline gradually moves backward (recedes) and forms an "M" shape. Eventually the hair becomes finer, shorter, and thinner, and creates a U-shaped (or horseshoe) pattern of hair around the sides of the head. [/bt_spoiler] [bt_spoiler title=" How common is male pattern hair loss?" icon="list"] Male pattern hair loss affects nearly all men at some point in their lives. It affects different populations at different rates, probably because of genetics. Up to half of male Caucasians will experience some degree of hair loss by age 50, and possibly as many as 80% by the age of 70 years, while other population groups such as Japanese and Chinese men are far less affected. [/bt_spoiler] [bt_spoiler title="Exams and Tests" icon="list"] Classic male pattern baldness is usually diagnosed based on the appearance and pattern of the hair loss.Hair loss may be due to other conditions. This may be true if hair loss occurs in patches, you shed a lot of hair, your hair breaks, or you have hair loss along with redness, scaling, pus, or pain.
A skin biopsy, blood tests, or other procedures may be needed to diagnose other disorders that cause hair loss.Hair analysis is not accurate for diagnosing hair loss due to nutritional or similar disorders. But it may reveal substances such as arsenic or lead. [/bt_spoiler] [bt_spoiler title="Treatment" icon="list"] Treatment is not necessary if you are comfortable with your appearance. Hair weaving, hairpieces, or change of hairstyle may disguise the hair loss. This is usually the least expensive and safest approach for male baldness. Medicines that treat male pattern baldness include:
--Minoxidil (Rogaine), a solution that is applied directly to the scalp to stimulate the hair follicles. It slows hair loss for many men, and some men grow new hair. Hair loss returns when you stop using this medicine.
--Finasteride (Propecia, Proscar), a pill that interferes with the production of a highly active form of testosterone that is linked to baldness. It slows hair loss. It works slightly better than minoxidil. Hair loss returns when you stop using this medicine.
--Dutasteride is similar to finasteride, but may be more effective.
Hair transplants consist of removing tiny plugs of hair from areas where the hair is continuing to grow and placing them in areas that are balding. This can cause minor scarring and possibly, infection. The procedure usually requires multiple sessions and may be expensive.
Suturing hair pieces to the scalp is not recommended. It can result in scars, infections, and abscessof the scalp. The use of hair implants made of artificial fibers was banned by the FDA because of the high rate of infection. [/bt_spoiler] [bt_spoiler title="When to see a doctor?" icon="list"] Call your health care provider if:
--Your hair loss occurs in an atypical pattern, including rapid hair loss, widespread shedding, hair loss in patches, or hair breakage.
--Your hair loss occurs with itching, skin irritation, redness, scaling, pain, or other symptoms.
--Your hair loss begins after starting a medicine.
--You want to treat your hair loss. [/bt_spoiler] [/bt_accordion]

Male pattern hair loss is an inherited condition, caused by a genetically determined sensitivity to the effects of dihydrotestosterone, or DHT in some areas of the scalp.

Definition
Hair loss resulting in thinning is known as alopecia. When it is related to hormones (androgens) and genetics, it is known as androgenetic alopecia. When androgenetic alopecia denudes an area of the scalp it is called baldness. Male pattern hair loss is characterised by a receding hairline and/or hair loss on the top and front of the head.
Causes
Male pattern baldness is related to your genes and male sex hormones. It usually follows a pattern of receding hairline and hair thinning on the crown, and is caused by hormones and genetic predisposition.
Each strand of hair you have sits in a tiny hole (cavity) in the skin called a follicle. Generally, baldness occurs when the hair follicle shrinks over time, resulting in shorter and finer hair. Eventually, the follicle does not grow new hair. The follicles remain alive, which suggests that it is still possible to grow new hair.
What is the normal hair growth cycle?
All hair follicles are replaced at different rates by the normal process of hair cycling. Hair growth alternates between phases of activity and rest. The growth period, called the anagen phase, lasts for two to six years. During this time, the follicle is long and deep, and produces thick, well-pigmented hair. About 90% of all scalp hairs are in the anagen phase at a given time.
Anagen is followed by a brief transition phase known as the catagen phase, which lasts 1–2 weeks. During this time, the base of the follicle shrivels. The resting period, or telogen phase, follows catagen and lasts for 3 months. In this phase, the shrunken follicle retains the hair fibre. Following the telogen phase, the next anagen phase begins, and the old hair is dislodged and falls out to make room for a new hair to begin growing in its place.
Symptoms
The typical pattern of male baldness begins at the hairline. The hairline gradually moves backward (recedes) and forms an "M" shape. Eventually the hair becomes finer, shorter, and thinner, and creates a U-shaped (or horseshoe) pattern of hair around the sides of the head.
How common is male pattern hair loss?
Male pattern hair loss affects nearly all men at some point in their lives. It affects different populations at different rates, probably because of genetics. Up to half of male Caucasians will experience some degree of hair loss by age 50, and possibly as many as 80% by the age of 70 years, while other population groups such as Japanese and Chinese men are far less affected.
Exams and Tests
Classic male pattern baldness is usually diagnosed based on the appearance and pattern of the hair loss.Hair loss may be due to other conditions. This may be true if hair loss occurs in patches, you shed a lot of hair, your hair breaks, or you have hair loss along with redness, scaling, pus, or pain.
A skin biopsy, blood tests, or other procedures may be needed to diagnose other disorders that cause hair loss.Hair analysis is not accurate for diagnosing hair loss due to nutritional or similar disorders. But it may reveal substances such as arsenic or lead.
Treatment
Treatment is not necessary if you are comfortable with your appearance. Hair weaving, hairpieces, or change of hairstyle may disguise the hair loss. This is usually the least expensive and safest approach for male baldness. Medicines that treat male pattern baldness include:
--Minoxidil (Rogaine), a solution that is applied directly to the scalp to stimulate the hair follicles. It slows hair loss for many men, and some men grow new hair. Hair loss returns when you stop using this medicine.
--Finasteride (Propecia, Proscar), a pill that interferes with the production of a highly active form of testosterone that is linked to baldness. It slows hair loss. It works slightly better than minoxidil. Hair loss returns when you stop using this medicine.
--Dutasteride is similar to finasteride, but may be more effective.
Hair transplants consist of removing tiny plugs of hair from areas where the hair is continuing to grow and placing them in areas that are balding. This can cause minor scarring and possibly, infection. The procedure usually requires multiple sessions and may be expensive.
Suturing hair pieces to the scalp is not recommended. It can result in scars, infections, and abscessof the scalp. The use of hair implants made of artificial fibers was banned by the FDA because of the high rate of infection.
When to see a doctor?
Call your health care provider if:
--Your hair loss occurs in an atypical pattern, including rapid hair loss, widespread shedding, hair loss in patches, or hair breakage.
--Your hair loss occurs with itching, skin irritation, redness, scaling, pain, or other symptoms.
--Your hair loss begins after starting a medicine.
--You want to treat your hair loss.