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Breast Reduction

Breast Reduction

[bt_quote style="box" width="0"] The goal of breast reduction surgery is to reduce the size of your breasts and reshape them so that they are proportionate to the rest of your body and are no longer a source of physical discomfort. [/bt_quote] [bt_accordion width="0" active_first="yes" icon="plus-square-1"] [bt_spoiler title="Definition" icon="list"] Breast reduction surgery, also known as reduction mammaplasty, is a procedure used to remove excess fat, tissue and skin from the breasts. If you have large breasts, you might choose to have breast reduction surgery to ease discomfort or to achieve a breast size proportionate to your body.
Breast reduction surgery might also help improve your self-image and self-confidence and your ability to participate in physical activities.
If you're considering breast reduction surgery, consult a board-certified plastic surgeon. It's important to understand what breast reduction surgery entails — including possible risks and complications — as well as set realistic expectations. [/bt_spoiler] [bt_spoiler title=" Why it’s Done?" icon="list"] Breast reduction surgery is meant for women who have large breasts and want to resolve issues such as:
-- Chronic back, neck and shoulder pain
-- Chronic rash or skin irritation under the breasts
-- Deep grooves in the shoulders from bra strap pressure
-- Restricted activity
-- Poor self-image related to large breasts
-- Difficulty fitting into bras and clothing
-- Difficulty sleeping
You can have breast reduction surgery at any age — even as a teenager in some cases. However, it's usually best to wait until your breasts are fully developed.
If you haven't started a family or your family isn't yet complete, you might postpone breast reduction surgery until pregnancy isn't an issue. Changes to breast tissue during pregnancy could affect your surgical results.
Also, breast-feeding might be challenging after breast reduction surgery — although some research suggests that breast-feeding difficulty after breast reduction surgery is related to a lack of support or coaching rather than the surgery itself. [/bt_spoiler] [bt_spoiler title=" Are you a good candidate for a breast reduction? " icon="list"] Women who seek breast reduction often have had children, are overweight, have a predisposition for large, disproportionate breasts, or are sensitive to estrogen. Big breasts often run in a family, inherited from mothers and grandmothers.
Following are some common reasons why you may want to consider breast reduction:
-- You have backaches, neck aches, or skin irritation under your breasts.
-- You have difficulty breathing and notice grooves in your shoulders from your bra straps.
-- You have poor posture or numbness in parts of your breasts and upper chest from excessive breast weight.
-- You find it nearly impossible to buy dresses and blouses and difficult to find tops that fit.
-- You are very unhappy with your appearance because of your breast size.
-- You are in good health with no active diseases or pre-existing medical conditions.
-- You have realistic expectations of the outcome of your surgery. You must be able to discuss what you want with your plastic surgeon so that you can reach an understanding of what can realistically be achieved.
-- Your skin has adequate elasticity, so it can resume its former tightness following surgery.
-- You are mentally and emotionally stable. Breast reduction requires patience and stability to deal with the healing period.
-- You are old enough so that your breast development has stopped.
-- You have finished having children and breast-feeding, because this can have significant and unpredictable effects on the size and shape of your breasts. Nevertheless, many women decide to undergo breast reduction before having children and feel that they can address any subsequent changes later. If you plan to breast-feed in the future, you should discuss this with your plastic surgeon.
A history of irregular mammograms, undiagnosed lumps or other types of masses, severe obesity, diabetes, wound healing disorders, current breast-feeding, smoking, clotting disorders or a family history of them, and heart or circulatory disorders are all contraindications for breast reduction.
If you are in good general health and have a positive attitude and realistic expectations, you are most likely a good candidate for this procedure. [/bt_spoiler] [bt_spoiler title=" Risks" icon="list"] Breast reduction surgery has the same risks as any other type of major surgery — bleeding, infection and an adverse reaction to the anesthesia. Other possible risks include:
-- Scarring
-- Loss of sensation in the nipples and skin surrounding the nipples (areolae)
-- Difficulty or inability to breast-feed
-- Differences in the size, shape and symmetry (asymmetry) of the surgically altered left and right breasts, which might lead to further surgery to improve appearance.
The risk of poor wound healing seems to increase with the amount of breast tissue removed. However, it isn't clear that women with a higher body mass index are at greater risk of complications from breast reduction surgery. [/bt_spoiler] [bt_spoiler title=" Benefits of Breast Reduction Surgery?" icon="list"] -- Increased self-confidence and self-esteem
-- A wider choice of bras/swimwear
-- Improvement in posture
-- The ability to wear more fitted clothing
-- Reduced chance backache
-- Ability to participate in sporting activities [/bt_spoiler] [bt_spoiler title=" How You Prepare?" icon="list"] Your plastic surgeon will likely:
-- Evaluate your medical history and overall health
-- Discuss your expectations for breast size and appearance after the surgery
-- Provide a detailed description of the procedure and its risks and benefits, including likely scarring and possible loss of sensation
-- Examine and measure your breasts
-- Take photographs of your breasts for your medical record
-- Explain the type of anesthesia used during surgery
Before breast reduction surgery, you might also be asked to:
-- Complete various lab tests
-- Get a baseline mammogram
-- Stop smoking for a certain period of time before and after surgery
-- Avoid taking aspirin, anti-inflammatory drugs and herbal supplements to control bleeding during surgery
Ask your surgeon whether you'll be able to go home the day of the surgery or whether you'll need to spend a night in the hospital. In either case, arrange for someone to drive you home after surgery. [/bt_spoiler] [bt_spoiler title=" Procedure" icon="list"] Breast reduction surgery is a commonly performed and straightforward operation which involves reducing the amount of breast and fatty tissues whilst uplifting the breast tissue. The operation is carried out under general anaesthetic and you will be required to stay in hospital for one to two nights, and to take one to two weeks off work. The surgery itself usually takes around three hours to complete, but this is dependent on the size of your breasts and on whether the surgeon needs to reposition the nipples in order to achieve a completely natural look after the breast reduction. [/bt_spoiler] [bt_spoiler title=" What You Can Expect" icon="list"] Breast reduction surgery is usually done under general anesthesia, either in a hospital or outpatient surgical facility.
During the procedure
The specific technique used to reduce the size of your breasts may vary. Generally, the surgeon makes an incision around the areola and down the breast. Excess breast tissue, fat and skin are then removed to reduce the size of each breast.
In most cases, the nipple and areola remain attached to the breast. If your breasts are very large and droopy, however, your nipple and areola might need to be removed and then reattached at a higher position on your breast as a skin graft.
After the procedure
Your breasts will be covered with a gauze dressing or bandages. A tube might be placed under each arm to drain any excess blood or fluid. Your surgeon will likely prescribe medication for pain as well as antibiotics to decrease your risk of infection.
For the first days or week, your breasts will probably feel tender and sensitive. They might also be swollen and bruised. Your surgeon might recommend an elastic compression bra initially to protect the breasts.
You'll need to limit physical activity for two to four weeks while the breasts heal. Your surgeon also may recommend avoiding underwire bras for a month after surgery.
Scarring usually fades over time. You will need a follow-up visit with your surgeon to remove stitches and check your recovery. [/bt_spoiler] [/bt_accordion]

The goal of breast reduction surgery is to reduce the size of your breasts and reshape them so that they are proportionate to the rest of your body and are no longer a source of physical discomfort.

Definition
Breast reduction surgery, also known as reduction mammaplasty, is a procedure used to remove excess fat, tissue and skin from the breasts. If you have large breasts, you might choose to have breast reduction surgery to ease discomfort or to achieve a breast size proportionate to your body.
Breast reduction surgery might also help improve your self-image and self-confidence and your ability to participate in physical activities.
If you're considering breast reduction surgery, consult a board-certified plastic surgeon. It's important to understand what breast reduction surgery entails — including possible risks and complications — as well as set realistic expectations.
Why it’s Done?
Breast reduction surgery is meant for women who have large breasts and want to resolve issues such as:
-- Chronic back, neck and shoulder pain
-- Chronic rash or skin irritation under the breasts
-- Deep grooves in the shoulders from bra strap pressure
-- Restricted activity
-- Poor self-image related to large breasts
-- Difficulty fitting into bras and clothing
-- Difficulty sleeping
You can have breast reduction surgery at any age — even as a teenager in some cases. However, it's usually best to wait until your breasts are fully developed.
If you haven't started a family or your family isn't yet complete, you might postpone breast reduction surgery until pregnancy isn't an issue. Changes to breast tissue during pregnancy could affect your surgical results.
Also, breast-feeding might be challenging after breast reduction surgery — although some research suggests that breast-feeding difficulty after breast reduction surgery is related to a lack of support or coaching rather than the surgery itself.
Are you a good candidate for a breast reduction?
Women who seek breast reduction often have had children, are overweight, have a predisposition for large, disproportionate breasts, or are sensitive to estrogen. Big breasts often run in a family, inherited from mothers and grandmothers.
Following are some common reasons why you may want to consider breast reduction:
-- You have backaches, neck aches, or skin irritation under your breasts.
-- You have difficulty breathing and notice grooves in your shoulders from your bra straps.
-- You have poor posture or numbness in parts of your breasts and upper chest from excessive breast weight.
-- You find it nearly impossible to buy dresses and blouses and difficult to find tops that fit.
-- You are very unhappy with your appearance because of your breast size.
-- You are in good health with no active diseases or pre-existing medical conditions.
-- You have realistic expectations of the outcome of your surgery. You must be able to discuss what you want with your plastic surgeon so that you can reach an understanding of what can realistically be achieved.
-- Your skin has adequate elasticity, so it can resume its former tightness following surgery.
-- You are mentally and emotionally stable. Breast reduction requires patience and stability to deal with the healing period.
-- You are old enough so that your breast development has stopped.
-- You have finished having children and breast-feeding, because this can have significant and unpredictable effects on the size and shape of your breasts. Nevertheless, many women decide to undergo breast reduction before having children and feel that they can address any subsequent changes later. If you plan to breast-feed in the future, you should discuss this with your plastic surgeon.
A history of irregular mammograms, undiagnosed lumps or other types of masses, severe obesity, diabetes, wound healing disorders, current breast-feeding, smoking, clotting disorders or a family history of them, and heart or circulatory disorders are all contraindications for breast reduction.
If you are in good general health and have a positive attitude and realistic expectations, you are most likely a good candidate for this procedure.
Risks
Breast reduction surgery has the same risks as any other type of major surgery — bleeding, infection and an adverse reaction to the anesthesia. Other possible risks include:
-- Scarring
-- Loss of sensation in the nipples and skin surrounding the nipples (areolae)
-- Difficulty or inability to breast-feed
-- Differences in the size, shape and symmetry (asymmetry) of the surgically altered left and right breasts, which might lead to further surgery to improve appearance.
The risk of poor wound healing seems to increase with the amount of breast tissue removed. However, it isn't clear that women with a higher body mass index are at greater risk of complications from breast reduction surgery.
Benefits of Breast Reduction Surgery?
-- Increased self-confidence and self-esteem
-- A wider choice of bras/swimwear
-- Improvement in posture
-- The ability to wear more fitted clothing
-- Reduced chance backache
-- Ability to participate in sporting activities
How You Prepare?
Your plastic surgeon will likely:
-- Evaluate your medical history and overall health
-- Discuss your expectations for breast size and appearance after the surgery
-- Provide a detailed description of the procedure and its risks and benefits, including likely scarring and possible loss of sensation
-- Examine and measure your breasts
-- Take photographs of your breasts for your medical record
-- Explain the type of anesthesia used during surgery
Before breast reduction surgery, you might also be asked to:
-- Complete various lab tests
-- Get a baseline mammogram
-- Stop smoking for a certain period of time before and after surgery
-- Avoid taking aspirin, anti-inflammatory drugs and herbal supplements to control bleeding during surgery
Ask your surgeon whether you'll be able to go home the day of the surgery or whether you'll need to spend a night in the hospital. In either case, arrange for someone to drive you home after surgery.
Procedure
Breast reduction surgery is a commonly performed and straightforward operation which involves reducing the amount of breast and fatty tissues whilst uplifting the breast tissue. The operation is carried out under general anaesthetic and you will be required to stay in hospital for one to two nights, and to take one to two weeks off work. The surgery itself usually takes around three hours to complete, but this is dependent on the size of your breasts and on whether the surgeon needs to reposition the nipples in order to achieve a completely natural look after the breast reduction.
What You Can Expect
Breast reduction surgery is usually done under general anesthesia, either in a hospital or outpatient surgical facility.
During the procedure
The specific technique used to reduce the size of your breasts may vary. Generally, the surgeon makes an incision around the areola and down the breast. Excess breast tissue, fat and skin are then removed to reduce the size of each breast.
In most cases, the nipple and areola remain attached to the breast. If your breasts are very large and droopy, however, your nipple and areola might need to be removed and then reattached at a higher position on your breast as a skin graft.
After the procedure
Your breasts will be covered with a gauze dressing or bandages. A tube might be placed under each arm to drain any excess blood or fluid. Your surgeon will likely prescribe medication for pain as well as antibiotics to decrease your risk of infection.
For the first days or week, your breasts will probably feel tender and sensitive. They might also be swollen and bruised. Your surgeon might recommend an elastic compression bra initially to protect the breasts.
You'll need to limit physical activity for two to four weeks while the breasts heal. Your surgeon also may recommend avoiding underwire bras for a month after surgery.
Scarring usually fades over time. You will need a follow-up visit with your surgeon to remove stitches and check your recovery.