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Micro-needling With Dermaroller

Micro-needling With Dermaroller

[bt_quote style="box" width="0"] Dermarollers resemble small paint rollers you would use to get into tight spots. They have a round, rotating cylinder with at least 200 tiny needles protruding from it, and a handle for moving it around your face. [/bt_quote] [bt_accordion width="0" active_first="yes" icon="plus-square-1"] [bt_spoiler title="Definition" icon="list"] Micro-needling is a general term for a process that involves moving a special device over your skin that has a roller with many tiny (usually metal) needles embedded in it. There are different kinds of micro-needling devices with different product names. One is the manual version of micro-needling called a Dermaroller. There are also motorized devices such as the Dermapen or Dermastamp. For the most part, these micro-needling devices have reasonable science behind them indicating they may help in reducing the appearance of scars, but there’s far less support for their ability to address wrinkles or for their ability to help anti-aging ingredients absorb better into skin. Dermarollers resemble small paint rollers you would use to get into tight spots. They act as miniature aerators, like something you’d use on your lawn. They have a round, rotating cylinder with at least 200 tiny needles protruding from it, and a handle for moving it around your face. And that’s exactly what you’re supposed to do with it: You roll this quasi-aerator over your skin with some amount of pressure, puncturing hundreds of tiny holes along the way. [/bt_spoiler] [bt_spoiler title=" Benefits of Micro-needling and Derma Rollers?" icon="list"] There are three primary uses for micro-needling devices, but not all of them are beneficial. The first, which has some good research behind it, is to break down the thick collagen that causes some types of scarring.
The other two uses are more questionable, especially in terms of wrinkles. They include stimulating collagen production by wounding skin, thereby improving the appearance of wrinkles, and enhancing delivery of skincare ingredients.
It seems clear from research that medical treatments using either the Dermastamp or the Dermapen to reduce scarring have the potential to produce good results. Whether or not the Dermaroller produces the same results is unclear because there’s almost no published research available. Theoretically, it should have the same results but it might not.
You may have seen claims that these needling procedures can also reduce cellulite. However, whether or not micro-needling of any kind can work on cellulite is at best dubious. That’s because cellulite involves fat deposits in connective tissue on the legs and buttocks, and needling skin cannot change any of this, not even a little. If you see results on your cellulite from needling, it’s most likely due to the inflammation from the needles, not because cellulite was reduced. Once the inflammation subsides, the cellulite looks just like it did before needling. So the needling can help, but just a little and the results will be temporary.
In terms of building collagen, the Dermapen and Dermastamp have emerging research about their benefits for wrinkles as an easy procedure that’s far less expensive than other devices or treatments. In contrast, the Dermaroller has no such research, though again, theoretically there’s logic to the concept. . [/bt_spoiler] [bt_spoiler title=" Dermarollers vs. Chemical Peels and Lasers? " icon="list"] The Dermaroller is often touted as being better than chemical peels or resurfacing lasers for wrinkles. The boast is that because it doesn’t remove the epidermis, yet still works to promote collagen production to repair the wounds it causes. The truth is that removing the surface layer of skin is a primary benefit of chemical peels and resurfacing lasers. Resurfacing the skin creates a notably smoother outer layer of skin because it removes layers of sun damaged skin—something micro-needling doesn’t do.
Besides, building collagen is only one way to improve wrinkles. Keep in mind that there many other types of lasers, light-emitting, radiofrequency, and ultrasound machines that don’t resurface skin and whose benefits go beyond what a Dermaroller can do. [/bt_spoiler] [bt_spoiler title=" Does Micro-needling Enhance Ingredient Penetration?" icon="list"] Another claim about the benefit of micro-needling is that it enhances the penetration into skin of prescription or cosmetic ingredients. Although there’s research showing the potential benefit of micro-needling as a means for delivering prescription drugs into skin, it’s developing research, not a standard practice by any means. The cosmetics industry doesn’t have the lead here!
In terms of skincare ingredients penetrating "deeper" by using the Dermaroller or similar tools, the benefit is at best dubious and minimally studied. Much of this research uses a small number of people and is often done by people (even doctors) representing the companies selling these tools. The major issue, as we mentioned, is the risk of constantly re-wounding skin, which eventually damages it.
The second issue is in regard to what skincare ingredients are going to be absorbed further into skin—and is that even a good thing? The claims are usually around improved penetration of everything from hyaluronic acid to retinol, and vitamin C. There are even claims that human or plant stem cells and growth factors can be used at home with these devices to absorb better into the skin.
By the way, even if skincare products claiming to contain stem cells or growth factors could work, they would have serious risks to the health of your skin. Since they can’t work, it’s really more a waste of your time and money than a real risk.
More to the point, gaining the benefit of toners, moisturizers, or serums with anti-aging ingredients isn’t just about maximum penetration. Ingredients like antioxidants, sunscreen actives, and skin-identical ingredients must stay in the top layers of skin to have benefit, including defense against environmental free-radical damage (which hit skin’s surface first).
There’s also the risk of getting unwanted ingredients (like preservatives or problematic plant extracts) deeper into skin, where their negative effects may be worse. Even beneficial ingredients like hyaluronic acid, vitamin C or retinol can be more sensitizing if they penetrate through a wound (yes, like when applied over broken or “punctured” skin), rather than being able to do their work in the uppermost layers of skin or penetrating deeper naturally through intact skin all on their own. By using a needling device every day, you could inadvertently be creating sensitive, highly reactive skin! [/bt_spoiler] [bt_spoiler title=" Dermaroller For Acne Scars-The Procedure?" icon="list"] Microneedling is a simple office-based procedure. The area to be treated is anesthetized with topical anesthesia for 45 minutes to one hour. After preparation of the area, rolling is done 15-20 times in horizontal, vertical, and oblique directions; Petechiae or pin-point bleeding which occurs is easily controlled. After treatment, the area is wetted with saline pads. The entire procedure lasts for 15 to 20 minutes, depending on the extent of the area to be treated.
A minimum of six weeks is recommended between two treatments as it takes that long for new natural collagen to form. Three to four treatments may be needed for moderate acne scars. [/bt_spoiler] [bt_spoiler title=" Post Procedure Care?" icon="list"] Microneedling is well tolerated by patients but erythema may be seen after treatment, lasting for 2-3 days. Photoprotection for a week is advised as a routine and local antibiotic creams may be prescribed. The patients can go back to work the very next day.
Apart from erythema, no other side effects have been reported. As the microholes close immediately, postoperative infections do not occur. The procedure is well tolerated and well accepted by the patients, is cost-effective, can be done on all skin types and on areas not suitable for peeling or laser resurfacing, such as near eyes. Microneedling with dermaroller can be combined with other acne scar treatments like subcision, chemical peels, microdermabrasion, and fractional resurfacing, thus maximizing the benefits to the patients. [/bt_spoiler] [/bt_accordion]

Dermarollers resemble small paint rollers you would use to get into tight spots. They have a round, rotating cylinder with at least 200 tiny needles protruding from it, and a handle for moving it around your face.

Definition
Micro-needling is a general term for a process that involves moving a special device over your skin that has a roller with many tiny (usually metal) needles embedded in it. There are different kinds of micro-needling devices with different product names. One is the manual version of micro-needling called a Dermaroller. There are also motorized devices such as the Dermapen or Dermastamp. For the most part, these micro-needling devices have reasonable science behind them indicating they may help in reducing the appearance of scars, but there’s far less support for their ability to address wrinkles or for their ability to help anti-aging ingredients absorb better into skin. Dermarollers resemble small paint rollers you would use to get into tight spots. They act as miniature aerators, like something you’d use on your lawn. They have a round, rotating cylinder with at least 200 tiny needles protruding from it, and a handle for moving it around your face. And that’s exactly what you’re supposed to do with it: You roll this quasi-aerator over your skin with some amount of pressure, puncturing hundreds of tiny holes along the way.
Benefits of Micro-needling and Derma Rollers?
There are three primary uses for micro-needling devices, but not all of them are beneficial. The first, which has some good research behind it, is to break down the thick collagen that causes some types of scarring.
The other two uses are more questionable, especially in terms of wrinkles. They include stimulating collagen production by wounding skin, thereby improving the appearance of wrinkles, and enhancing delivery of skincare ingredients.
It seems clear from research that medical treatments using either the Dermastamp or the Dermapen to reduce scarring have the potential to produce good results. Whether or not the Dermaroller produces the same results is unclear because there’s almost no published research available. Theoretically, it should have the same results but it might not.
You may have seen claims that these needling procedures can also reduce cellulite. However, whether or not micro-needling of any kind can work on cellulite is at best dubious. That’s because cellulite involves fat deposits in connective tissue on the legs and buttocks, and needling skin cannot change any of this, not even a little. If you see results on your cellulite from needling, it’s most likely due to the inflammation from the needles, not because cellulite was reduced. Once the inflammation subsides, the cellulite looks just like it did before needling. So the needling can help, but just a little and the results will be temporary.
In terms of building collagen, the Dermapen and Dermastamp have emerging research about their benefits for wrinkles as an easy procedure that’s far less expensive than other devices or treatments. In contrast, the Dermaroller has no such research, though again, theoretically there’s logic to the concept. .
Dermarollers vs. Chemical Peels and Lasers?
The Dermaroller is often touted as being better than chemical peels or resurfacing lasers for wrinkles. The boast is that because it doesn’t remove the epidermis, yet still works to promote collagen production to repair the wounds it causes. The truth is that removing the surface layer of skin is a primary benefit of chemical peels and resurfacing lasers. Resurfacing the skin creates a notably smoother outer layer of skin because it removes layers of sun damaged skin—something micro-needling doesn’t do.
Besides, building collagen is only one way to improve wrinkles. Keep in mind that there many other types of lasers, light-emitting, radiofrequency, and ultrasound machines that don’t resurface skin and whose benefits go beyond what a Dermaroller can do.
Does Micro-needling Enhance Ingredient Penetration?
Another claim about the benefit of micro-needling is that it enhances the penetration into skin of prescription or cosmetic ingredients. Although there’s research showing the potential benefit of micro-needling as a means for delivering prescription drugs into skin, it’s developing research, not a standard practice by any means. The cosmetics industry doesn’t have the lead here!
In terms of skincare ingredients penetrating "deeper" by using the Dermaroller or similar tools, the benefit is at best dubious and minimally studied. Much of this research uses a small number of people and is often done by people (even doctors) representing the companies selling these tools. The major issue, as we mentioned, is the risk of constantly re-wounding skin, which eventually damages it.
The second issue is in regard to what skincare ingredients are going to be absorbed further into skin—and is that even a good thing? The claims are usually around improved penetration of everything from hyaluronic acid to retinol, and vitamin C. There are even claims that human or plant stem cells and growth factors can be used at home with these devices to absorb better into the skin.
By the way, even if skincare products claiming to contain stem cells or growth factors could work, they would have serious risks to the health of your skin. Since they can’t work, it’s really more a waste of your time and money than a real risk.
More to the point, gaining the benefit of toners, moisturizers, or serums with anti-aging ingredients isn’t just about maximum penetration. Ingredients like antioxidants, sunscreen actives, and skin-identical ingredients must stay in the top layers of skin to have benefit, including defense against environmental free-radical damage (which hit skin’s surface first).
There’s also the risk of getting unwanted ingredients (like preservatives or problematic plant extracts) deeper into skin, where their negative effects may be worse. Even beneficial ingredients like hyaluronic acid, vitamin C or retinol can be more sensitizing if they penetrate through a wound (yes, like when applied over broken or “punctured” skin), rather than being able to do their work in the uppermost layers of skin or penetrating deeper naturally through intact skin all on their own. By using a needling device every day, you could inadvertently be creating sensitive, highly reactive skin!
Dermaroller For Acne Scars-The Procedure?
Microneedling is a simple office-based procedure. The area to be treated is anesthetized with topical anesthesia for 45 minutes to one hour. After preparation of the area, rolling is done 15-20 times in horizontal, vertical, and oblique directions; Petechiae or pin-point bleeding which occurs is easily controlled. After treatment, the area is wetted with saline pads. The entire procedure lasts for 15 to 20 minutes, depending on the extent of the area to be treated.
A minimum of six weeks is recommended between two treatments as it takes that long for new natural collagen to form. Three to four treatments may be needed for moderate acne scars.
Post Procedure Care?
Microneedling is well tolerated by patients but erythema may be seen after treatment, lasting for 2-3 days. Photoprotection for a week is advised as a routine and local antibiotic creams may be prescribed. The patients can go back to work the very next day.
Apart from erythema, no other side effects have been reported. As the microholes close immediately, postoperative infections do not occur. The procedure is well tolerated and well accepted by the patients, is cost-effective, can be done on all skin types and on areas not suitable for peeling or laser resurfacing, such as near eyes. Microneedling with dermaroller can be combined with other acne scar treatments like subcision, chemical peels, microdermabrasion, and fractional resurfacing, thus maximizing the benefits to the patients.