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Seborrheic Dermatitis

Seborrheic Dermatitis

[bt_quote style="box" width="0"]Usually beginning on the scalp as oily, waxy patches, this common type of eczema sometimes spreads to the face and beyond. A severe case, while rare, produces widespread lesions. Like most types of eczema, seborrheic dermatitis tends to flare in cold, dry weather.[/bt_quote]

[bt_accordion width="0" active_first="yes" icon="plus-square-1"][bt_spoiler title="Definition" icon="list"]Seborrheic (seb-o-REE-ik) dermatitis is a common skin condition that mainly affects your scalp. It causes scaly patches, red skin and stubborn dandruff. Seborrheic dermatitis can also affect oily areas of the body, such as the face, upper chest and back. Seborrheic dermatitis doesn't affect your overall health, but it can be uncomfortable and cause embarrassment. It isn't contagious, and it's not a sign of poor personal hygiene. Seborrheic dermatitis is usually a long-term condition. You may need many repeated treatments before the symptoms go away. And they may return later.
You may be able to manage flare-ups by recognizing seborrheic dermatitis symptoms and using a combination of self-care steps and medications. Seborrheic dermatitis is also called dandruff and seborrheic eczema. For infants, it's known as cradle cap.[/bt_spoiler][bt_spoiler title="Symptoms" icon="list"]Seborrheic dermatitis symptoms include:

-- Skin flakes (dandruff) on your scalp, hair, eyebrows, beard or mustache. 
-- Patches of greasy skin covered with flaky white or yellow scales or crust on the scalp, ears, face, chest, armpits, scrotum or other parts of the body.
-- Red skin.
-- Redness or crusting of the eyelids (blepharitis).
-- Possibly itching or stinging.

[/bt_spoiler][bt_spoiler title="Causes" icon="list"]Doctors don't yet know the exact cause of seborrheic dermatitis. But it may be related to:
-- A yeast (fungus) called malassezia that is in the oil secretion on the skin.
-- An inflammatory response related to psoriasis.
-- The season, with episodes tending to be worse in early spring and winter[/bt_spoiler]

[bt_spoiler title="Risk Factors" icon="list"]A number of factors increase your risk of developing seborrheic dermatitis, including:
-- Neurological and psychiatric conditions, such as Parkinson's disease and depression.
-- A weakened immune system, such as seen in organ transplant recipients and people with HIV/AIDS, alcoholic pancreatitis and some cancers.
-- Congestive heart failure.
-- Endocrine disease such as diabetes.
-- Some medications.
-- Scratching or otherwise damaging the skin on your face. [/bt_spoiler] [bt_spoiler title="Preparing for your appointment" icon="list"]What to expect from your doctor
At Skin and Sculpt doctor is likely to ask you a number of questions. Being ready to answer them may free up time to go over any points you want to spend more time on. Doctor may ask:
-- What are your symptoms, and when did you first notice them?
-- Is this the first time you've had these symptoms, or have you had them before?
-- How severe are your symptoms? Are they about the same all the time, getting worse, or sometimes better and sometimes worse?
-- Have you tried any at-home treatments, such creams, gels or shampoos?
-- How often do you use these treatments?
-- Does anything seem to help?
-- Does anything seem to make your symptoms worse?
-- What medications, vitamins or supplements are you taking?
-- Have you been under stress lately or experienced major life changes?

What you can do in the meantime
An over-the-counter (nonprescription) antifungal cream or anti-itch cream can be helpful. If your scalp is affected, a nonprescription antifungal shampoo may ease your symptoms. Try not to scratch or pick at the affected area, because if you irritate your skin or scratch it open, you increase your risk of infection.[/bt_spoiler] [bt_spoiler title="Tests and Diagnosis" icon="list"]Your doctor may scrape off skin cells for examination (biopsy) to rule out conditions with some symptoms similar to seborrheic dermatitis, including:
-- Psoriasis: This disorder also causes dandruff and red skin covered with flakes and scales. With psoriasis, usually you'll have more scales, and they'll be silvery white.
-- Atopic dermatitis (eczema): This skin reaction causes itchy, inflamed skin in the folds of the elbows, on the backs of the knees or on the front of the neck. It often recurs.
-- Rosacea: This condition usually occurs on the face and has very little scaliness. [/bt_spoiler] [bt_spoiler title="Treatments and Drugs" icon="list"]Medicated shampoos, creams and lotions are the main treatments for seborrheic dermatitis. Your doctor will likely recommend you try home remedies, such as over-the-counter dandruff shampoos, before considering prescription remedies. If home remedies haven't helped, talk with your doctor about trying these treatments:
-- Creams, shampoos or ointments that control inflammation. Prescription-strength hydrocortisone, fluocinolone or desonide (Desowen, Desonide) are corticosteroids you apply to the scalp or other affected area. They're effective and easy to use. But if used for many weeks or months without a break, they can cause side effects, such as thinning skin or skin showing streaks or lines.
-- Antifungal shampoo alternated with a stronger medication. Ketoconazole shampoo may be effective when alternated with a clobetasol scalp product (Temovate) twice weekly.
-- Antifungal medication you take as a pill. Your doctor may recommend the antifungal medication terbinafine (Lamisil). This option is not often used because it can have serious side effects, such as allergic reactions and liver problems.
-- Medications that affect your immune system. Creams or lotions containing the calcineurin inhibitors tacrolimus (Protopic) and pimecrolimus (Elidel) may be effective and have fewer side effects than corticosteroids do. But they are not first-choice treatments because of a potential increased risk of cancer. In addition, they cost more than mild corticosteroid medications.
-- Cream or gel that fights bacteria. You apply metronidazole (Metrolotion, Metrogel) as a cream or gel once or twice daily until you see improvement.
-- Light therapy with medication. This treatment combines psoralen with light therapy (photochemotherapy). After you take psoralen by mouth or apply it to the affected skin, you're exposed to ultraviolet light. This therapy may not work for people with thick hair.
[/bt_spoiler] [/bt_accordion]

Usually beginning on the scalp as oily, waxy patches, this common type of eczema sometimes spreads to the face and beyond. A severe case, while rare, produces widespread lesions. Like most types of eczema, seborrheic dermatitis tends to flare in cold, dry weather.

Definition
Seborrheic (seb-o-REE-ik) dermatitis is a common skin condition that mainly affects your scalp. It causes scaly patches, red skin and stubborn dandruff. Seborrheic dermatitis can also affect oily areas of the body, such as the face, upper chest and back. Seborrheic dermatitis doesn't affect your overall health, but it can be uncomfortable and cause embarrassment. It isn't contagious, and it's not a sign of poor personal hygiene. Seborrheic dermatitis is usually a long-term condition. You may need many repeated treatments before the symptoms go away. And they may return later.
You may be able to manage flare-ups by recognizing seborrheic dermatitis symptoms and using a combination of self-care steps and medications. Seborrheic dermatitis is also called dandruff and seborrheic eczema. For infants, it's known as cradle cap.
Symptoms
Seborrheic dermatitis symptoms include:

-- Skin flakes (dandruff) on your scalp, hair, eyebrows, beard or mustache. 
-- Patches of greasy skin covered with flaky white or yellow scales or crust on the scalp, ears, face, chest, armpits, scrotum or other parts of the body.
-- Red skin.
-- Redness or crusting of the eyelids (blepharitis).
-- Possibly itching or stinging.

Causes
Doctors don't yet know the exact cause of seborrheic dermatitis. But it may be related to:
-- A yeast (fungus) called malassezia that is in the oil secretion on the skin.
-- An inflammatory response related to psoriasis.
-- The season, with episodes tending to be worse in early spring and winter

Risk Factors
A number of factors increase your risk of developing seborrheic dermatitis, including:
-- Neurological and psychiatric conditions, such as Parkinson's disease and depression.
-- A weakened immune system, such as seen in organ transplant recipients and people with HIV/AIDS, alcoholic pancreatitis and some cancers.
-- Congestive heart failure.
-- Endocrine disease such as diabetes.
-- Some medications.
-- Scratching or otherwise damaging the skin on your face.
Preparing for your appointment
What to expect from your doctor
At Skin and Sculpt doctor is likely to ask you a number of questions. Being ready to answer them may free up time to go over any points you want to spend more time on. Doctor may ask:
-- What are your symptoms, and when did you first notice them?
-- Is this the first time you've had these symptoms, or have you had them before?
-- How severe are your symptoms? Are they about the same all the time, getting worse, or sometimes better and sometimes worse?
-- Have you tried any at-home treatments, such creams, gels or shampoos?
-- How often do you use these treatments?
-- Does anything seem to help?
-- Does anything seem to make your symptoms worse?
-- What medications, vitamins or supplements are you taking?
-- Have you been under stress lately or experienced major life changes?

What you can do in the meantime
An over-the-counter (nonprescription) antifungal cream or anti-itch cream can be helpful. If your scalp is affected, a nonprescription antifungal shampoo may ease your symptoms. Try not to scratch or pick at the affected area, because if you irritate your skin or scratch it open, you increase your risk of infection.
Tests and Diagnosis
Your doctor may scrape off skin cells for examination (biopsy) to rule out conditions with some symptoms similar to seborrheic dermatitis, including:
-- Psoriasis: This disorder also causes dandruff and red skin covered with flakes and scales. With psoriasis, usually you'll have more scales, and they'll be silvery white.
-- Atopic dermatitis (eczema): This skin reaction causes itchy, inflamed skin in the folds of the elbows, on the backs of the knees or on the front of the neck. It often recurs.
-- Rosacea: This condition usually occurs on the face and has very little scaliness.
Treatments and Drugs
Medicated shampoos, creams and lotions are the main treatments for seborrheic dermatitis. Your doctor will likely recommend you try home remedies, such as over-the-counter dandruff shampoos, before considering prescription remedies. If home remedies haven't helped, talk with your doctor about trying these treatments:
-- Creams, shampoos or ointments that control inflammation. Prescription-strength hydrocortisone, fluocinolone or desonide (Desowen, Desonide) are corticosteroids you apply to the scalp or other affected area. They're effective and easy to use. But if used for many weeks or months without a break, they can cause side effects, such as thinning skin or skin showing streaks or lines.
-- Antifungal shampoo alternated with a stronger medication. Ketoconazole shampoo may be effective when alternated with a clobetasol scalp product (Temovate) twice weekly.
-- Antifungal medication you take as a pill. Your doctor may recommend the antifungal medication terbinafine (Lamisil). This option is not often used because it can have serious side effects, such as allergic reactions and liver problems.
-- Medications that affect your immune system. Creams or lotions containing the calcineurin inhibitors tacrolimus (Protopic) and pimecrolimus (Elidel) may be effective and have fewer side effects than corticosteroids do. But they are not first-choice treatments because of a potential increased risk of cancer. In addition, they cost more than mild corticosteroid medications.
-- Cream or gel that fights bacteria. You apply metronidazole (Metrolotion, Metrogel) as a cream or gel once or twice daily until you see improvement.
-- Light therapy with medication. This treatment combines psoralen with light therapy (photochemotherapy). After you take psoralen by mouth or apply it to the affected skin, you're exposed to ultraviolet light. This therapy may not work for people with thick hair.