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Dark Circles

Dark Circles

[bt_quote style="box" width="0"] Also called 'eye circles', are blemishes around or under the eyes. There are many causes of dark circles, such as lack of sleep, hereditary, or allergy-related. There is no one cure for dark circles, unless you found out what the cause is. There are some bleaching creams, but they are known to cause cancer. [/bt_quote] [bt_accordion width="0" active_first="yes" icon="plus-square-1"] [bt_spoiler title="Definition" icon="list"] If you get plenty of sleep and still have dark circles under your eyes, that's not unusual. Fatigue isn't the only reason for dark circles under your eyes. What appear to be dark circles under your eyes are sometimes just shadows cast by puffy eyelids or hollows under your eyes that develop as a normal part of aging. [/bt_spoiler] [bt_spoiler title="Causes" icon="list"] When you spot those pesky dark circles under your eyes, is your lack of sleep the first thing you blame? While getting a decent amount of shut eye is incredibly important, being tired isn't the only reason your skin appears red, purple, and even a little blue. These are seven other things that could be keeping the area under your eyes from looking their best and brightest. Here are some of the most common causes of true under-eye circles.
-- Your parents passed on bad genes.
That's right — your parents could be to blame for your dark circles. There are hereditary conditions that run in families that can lead to darkness under the eyes. This is very common in people with Mediterranean backgrounds. The good news: if it's pigmentation, there are specific lasers dermatologists can use that can help you get rid of it.
-- Eczema could be leading you to rub.
While the eczema itself may not lead to the dark circles, the constant rubbing and itching most certainly can. "Excessive rubbing can lead to increased swelling, inflammation, and broken blood vessels in the eye area, which can give the skin a dark, almost bruised appearance.
-- Allergies can make you itchy.
Skin conditions like eczema aren't the only health concern that can cause your under eye woes. Allergies often trigger histamines in the body which cause blood vessels to dilate. Since the skin on our eyelid and under eye area is some of the thinnest in the body, it may cause those swollen blood vessels to appear darker than the rest of the face. Take care of those allergies ASAP, then your derm can treat the pigmentation.
-- Your makeup could be irritating you.
It seems counterintuitive — makeup is supposed to cover up those dark circles, right? But if you're using a product, whether it's a mascara, eyeshadow, or even concealer, that bugs your skin, it could be leading to worsened circles. Some people develop allergic reactions to makeup, and they get circles from the irritation, rubbing, and scratching. If you notice your eyes are looking a little rough after using that trendy new eyeliner, perhaps steer clear.
-- Your bone structure could be to blame.
Surprisingly, your circles could have nothing to do with your actual skin — it could simply be the way your face is shaped. When people have deep tear troughs under their eyes, the shadowing and indentation can cause the appearance of darkness, but it's not actually from pigment or veins.
-- Veins can give you a blue tint.
If your eye areas look particularly blue, it could simply be your blood vessels. Blue veins under your eyes look dark, too, so it makes the eyelids and under eyes appear to have dark circles, but really it's just the veins under the skin.
-- You're not protecting your skin from the sun.
You may think heading outside could brighten up your skin, but not if you let your delicate under eye area get too exposed. Eyelid skin is the thinnest in the body, so sun damage shows up quickly in this area in the form of dilating and increased blood flow. "As a result, you can see a dark glow or color through the transparency of the skin." Just another reason to wear SPF!
[/bt_spoiler] [bt_spoiler title=" When to see a doctor " icon="list"] If discoloration and swelling appear under just one eye and seem to get worse over time, talk to your primary care doctor. If you want a more lasting solution than concealers and over-the-counter creams can provide, see your dermatologist for advice.
Depending on what's causing the circles under your eyes, your doctor may recommend prescription creams or a combination of treatments to erase or reduce discoloration. Laser therapy or chemical peels can be helpful in some cases. Hollows that cause shadows can be smoothed with injectable fillers, and surgery can eliminate puffy lids.
However, dark under-eye circles usually aren't a medical problem, and home remedies for dark circles under eyes may be all you need to help manage this condition.
Self-care
Mild to moderate dark circles often respond well to simple and inexpensive treatments, such as:
-- Cold. Try a cold compress, two chilled teaspoons or a bag of frozen peas wrapped in a soft cloth to temporarily reduce dilated and discolored under-eye blood vessels.
-- Extra pillows. Elevate your head with two or more pillows to prevent puffiness that develops when fluid pools in your lower eyelids.
-- Extra sleep. Although short nights don't usually cause under-eye circles, a lack of sleep makes you paler and more hollow-eyed, so shadows and circles you already have become more obvious.
[/bt_spoiler] [/bt_accordion]

Also called 'eye circles', are blemishes around or under the eyes. There are many causes of dark circles, such as lack of sleep, hereditary, or allergy-related. There is no one cure for dark circles, unless you found out what the cause is. There are some bleaching creams, but they are known to cause cancer.

Definition
If you get plenty of sleep and still have dark circles under your eyes, that's not unusual. Fatigue isn't the only reason for dark circles under your eyes. What appear to be dark circles under your eyes are sometimes just shadows cast by puffy eyelids or hollows under your eyes that develop as a normal part of aging.
Causes
When you spot those pesky dark circles under your eyes, is your lack of sleep the first thing you blame? While getting a decent amount of shut eye is incredibly important, being tired isn't the only reason your skin appears red, purple, and even a little blue. These are seven other things that could be keeping the area under your eyes from looking their best and brightest. Here are some of the most common causes of true under-eye circles.
-- Your parents passed on bad genes.
That's right — your parents could be to blame for your dark circles. There are hereditary conditions that run in families that can lead to darkness under the eyes. This is very common in people with Mediterranean backgrounds. The good news: if it's pigmentation, there are specific lasers dermatologists can use that can help you get rid of it.
-- Eczema could be leading you to rub.
While the eczema itself may not lead to the dark circles, the constant rubbing and itching most certainly can. "Excessive rubbing can lead to increased swelling, inflammation, and broken blood vessels in the eye area, which can give the skin a dark, almost bruised appearance.
-- Allergies can make you itchy.
Skin conditions like eczema aren't the only health concern that can cause your under eye woes. Allergies often trigger histamines in the body which cause blood vessels to dilate. Since the skin on our eyelid and under eye area is some of the thinnest in the body, it may cause those swollen blood vessels to appear darker than the rest of the face. Take care of those allergies ASAP, then your derm can treat the pigmentation.
-- Your makeup could be irritating you.
It seems counterintuitive — makeup is supposed to cover up those dark circles, right? But if you're using a product, whether it's a mascara, eyeshadow, or even concealer, that bugs your skin, it could be leading to worsened circles. Some people develop allergic reactions to makeup, and they get circles from the irritation, rubbing, and scratching. If you notice your eyes are looking a little rough after using that trendy new eyeliner, perhaps steer clear.
-- Your bone structure could be to blame.
Surprisingly, your circles could have nothing to do with your actual skin — it could simply be the way your face is shaped. When people have deep tear troughs under their eyes, the shadowing and indentation can cause the appearance of darkness, but it's not actually from pigment or veins.
-- Veins can give you a blue tint.
If your eye areas look particularly blue, it could simply be your blood vessels. Blue veins under your eyes look dark, too, so it makes the eyelids and under eyes appear to have dark circles, but really it's just the veins under the skin.
-- You're not protecting your skin from the sun.
You may think heading outside could brighten up your skin, but not if you let your delicate under eye area get too exposed. Eyelid skin is the thinnest in the body, so sun damage shows up quickly in this area in the form of dilating and increased blood flow. "As a result, you can see a dark glow or color through the transparency of the skin." Just another reason to wear SPF!
When to see a doctor
If discoloration and swelling appear under just one eye and seem to get worse over time, talk to your primary care doctor. If you want a more lasting solution than concealers and over-the-counter creams can provide, see your dermatologist for advice.
Depending on what's causing the circles under your eyes, your doctor may recommend prescription creams or a combination of treatments to erase or reduce discoloration. Laser therapy or chemical peels can be helpful in some cases. Hollows that cause shadows can be smoothed with injectable fillers, and surgery can eliminate puffy lids.
However, dark under-eye circles usually aren't a medical problem, and home remedies for dark circles under eyes may be all you need to help manage this condition.
Self-care
Mild to moderate dark circles often respond well to simple and inexpensive treatments, such as:
-- Cold. Try a cold compress, two chilled teaspoons or a bag of frozen peas wrapped in a soft cloth to temporarily reduce dilated and discolored under-eye blood vessels.
-- Extra pillows. Elevate your head with two or more pillows to prevent puffiness that develops when fluid pools in your lower eyelids.
-- Extra sleep. Although short nights don't usually cause under-eye circles, a lack of sleep makes you paler and more hollow-eyed, so shadows and circles you already have become more obvious.